Major cryptocurrency exchange Crypto.com has lost about $15 million worth of Ether (ETH) to hackers, according to blockchain security firm PeckShield.

The @cryptocom loss is about $15M, with at least 4.6K ETH, half of which is currently being laundered via @TornadoCash https://t.co/PUl6IrB3cp https://t.co/6SVKvk8PLf pic.twitter.com/XN9nmT857j Cleaning

– PeckShield Inc. (@peckshield) January 18, 2022

Half of the stolen cryptocurrencies are being laundered with the help of Tornado Cash, an ethereum-powered coin blending service.

On Monday, Crypto.com announced that it had stopped withdrawals due to "suspicious activity". Some users started complaining about the loss of funds.

It took 14 hours for the Singapore-based company to resume withdrawals.

In a recent Twitter post, CEO Kris Marszalek said that no customer funds were lost. He also added that the Crypto.com team has strengthened the exchange's infrastructure in response to the incident. The exchange is still conducting an internal investigation into the security incident.

Some of my thoughts in the last 24 hours.

– No loss of customer funds – Approximately 14 hours of infrastructure removal downtime – Our team has enhanced the infrastructure to respond to incidents

Some Twitter users slammed Crypto.com for never mentioning how much cryptocurrency was stolen as a result of the hack.

Their tweet was “All funds are safe and back to normal” but they never mentioned the amount stolen or information about what happened …… Their communication was so bad. Thanks PeckShield!

–Mas🔺 (@JTuxon) January 18, 2022

Despite the rampant carpet-pulling and hacking in the decentralized financial space, it is unclear how such a high level of centralized exchanges became victims of the attack. Marszalek has promised to release an autopsy report as soon as the investigation is complete.

Earlier this month, American actor Matt Damon faced strong opposition over the "intimidating" Crypto.com ads he originally released last year.

In November, the Singapore-based company purchased the title rights to the Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles for $700 million.